Kobe Bryant’s Oscar-winning short film removed from website

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John Williams told the Los Angeles Times in 2017 Glen Keane’s Dear Basketball (2017) is “elegiac” without being “weepy.” (Image Courtesy: The Los Angeles Times).

After being briefly available online Monday, Glen Keane’s Kobe Bryant movie, Dear Basketball (2017), the winner of that year’s Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, has been taken down in the aftermath of the basketball star’s death, according to the Los Angeles Times. The five-minute picture is based off a poem Bryant wrote for the Players’ Tribune in November 2015 to announce his retirement, narrated by Bryant himself, scored by Oscar-winning composer John Williams, and animated by Keane, son of The Family Circus creator Bil Keane. A teaser trailer for the short will still be hosted on dearbasketball.com.

Prince William narrates sixty-second mental health film for millions of soccer fans

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Prince William says British people, men especially, stigmatize mental illness; according to Public Health England, there are more than fifteen million soccer fans in the United Kingdom, sixty-nine percent of whom are men. (Image Courtesy: CNN).

Prince William is the narrator for a one-minute film, Take a Minute – starring many soccer stars – from Public Health England’s Every Mind Matters, the English Football Association (of which he is president), as well as Heads Together’s Heads Up campaign, according to CNN. Kickoff times for all thirty-two fixtures of the third round of the English FA Cup will be delayed by sixty seconds Saturday, Sunday, and Monday, so the mental illness public service announcement can be shown at stadiums in front of millions of fans. William and his brother, Prince Harry, have advocated for a number of mental health causes since the traumatic death of their mother, Princess Diana, in 1997.