Francis Ford Coppola calls Marvel movies “despicable”

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Francis Ford Coppola says Marvel fails to enlighten, teach, or inspire. (Image Courtesy: Japan Today).

Francis Ford Coppola was awarded the Prix Lumiere in Lyon, France (joining the likes of Martin Scorsese, Pedro Almodovar, and Milos Forman as a recipient of the prestigious honor), and he spoke to local journalists about his thoughts on Marvel films, according to Japan Today. Expanding upon Scorsese’s now infamous remarks that the Marvel Cinematic Universe is “not cinema,” going so far as to call their output “theme park rides,” Coppola says the MCU is “despicable.” The Italian American auteur’s next project is Megalopolis, a utopian picture he has been nursing for two decades, which he promises will be even more ambitious than Apocalypse Now (1979).

Samuel L. Jackson sounds off on Martin Scorsese’s MCU comments

In response to Martin Scorsese’s opinions about the Marvel Cinematic Universe, Samuel L. Jackson, who stars as head of SHIELD Nick Fury in ten MCU films, reminds Variety readers the filmmaker’s movies are controversial among Italian Americans, according to The Guardian. Scorsese told Empire that Marvel pictures are “not cinema” after trying and failing to get interested in them. Other industry insiders speaking out against what Scorsese said about the MCU include James Gunn, who directed Guardians of the Galaxy (2014), Karen Gillan (who plays Nebula in Guardians), as well as Joss Whedon, the director behind The Avengers (2012).

The top ten highest-grossing films of all time, adjusted for inflation

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Victor Fleming’s Gone with the Wind (1939) sold over two hundred million tickets during its eight releases in the United States, where Anthony Russo and Joe Russo’s Avengers: Endgame (2019) has sold close to ninety-five million domestically since April, but would contemporary theatergoers come out to see Gone with the Wind? (Photo Courtesy: CNBC).

Anthony Russo and Joe Russo’s Avengers: Endgame (2019) has surpassed James Cameron’s Avatar (2009) as the top-grossing film of all time, according to CNBC. However, Hollywood doesn’t adjust box office records for inflation due to a number of variables, such as the new forms of entertainment accessible to modern audiences, evolving movie content, and the dozens of inflation rates across global markets. But Comscore, a media analytics company, divided the average ticket price the year a picture was released into its gross to estimate the number of tickets sold (still not an exact science, since averages are imperfect data), and ranked the top ten grossers as follows, from lowest to highest: David Hand, William Cottrell, Wilfred Jackson, Larry Morey, Pierce Pearce, and Ben Sharpsteen’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (1937); William Friedkin’s The Exorcist (1973); David Lean’s Doctor Zhivago (1965); Steven Spielberg’s Jaws (1975); Cecil B. DeMille’s The Ten Commandments (1956); James Cameron’s Titanic (1997); Steven Spielberg’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982); Robert Wise’s The Sound of Music (1965); George Lucas’s Star Wars (1977); and Victor Fleming’s Gone with the Wind (1939).